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Een selectie van de studenten bij GiMaRIS

2017

 

Simon van Goeverden, Universiteit Leiden

Microplastics aan de Nederlandse kust
 
Plastics in het mariene milieu zijn al langere tijd een grote zorg voor de wetenschap en er wordt al sinds de jaren 70 onderzoek naar gedaan. Recenter wordt er ook gekeken naar het voorkomen van kleine plastic deeltjes de gevolgen hiervan. Deze ‘’microplastics’’ kunnen ontstaan door het afbreken van groter plastic of als klein plastic verwerkt zijn in bijvoorbeeld cosmetica producten. Om te onderzoeken hoe veel microplastic er voorkomt aan de Nederlandse kust zijn er in de belangrijkste havens bodemmonsters genomen.  In deze stage heb ik een nieuwe methode geoptimaliseerd waarmee de microplastics uit bodemmonsters worden gehaald en kunnen worden geanalyseerd.
 

 

 

Niels Notenboom, Universiteit Leiden

Microplastics in Mosselen

2016

 

Martijn van der Bent, Universiteit Leiden

 
 

Tiarah de Doelder , Avans Breda

 

2015

 

Tamara de Costa, Universiteit Leiden

 
 

Pauline Jéhannet, Universiteit Leiden

 
 

Domenique Pauli,  Universiteit Leiden

A risk assessment of introducting nonindigenous species through recreational boating

 

 

Kees Wesdorp, Wageningen Universiteit

 

2014

 

Niels Notenboom, Universiteit Leiden

 
 

Arjan de Klepper

 

2013

 

Ilja Dekker, HS Leiden

Carcinus meanas: wereldveroveraar. Wereldwijde invasies vastgelegd door middel van populatie genetica
 
 

Guido Leurs, HAS Den Bosch

Mariene leefgemeenschappen op hard substraat
 
 

Lisette van Noort, Universiteit Leiden

Cryptic species in the family of Botryllidae along the Dutch coast & The
application of genetic analysis in recognition of cryptic species
 
Most of the species of the family of Botryllidae are known to contain a lot of colour morphs. Because the same colour morphs can be found in multiple species they can be easily confused with each other. Botryllus schlosseri is expected to contain more species based on a previous global genetic research, but morphology was left out. In this research it is attempted to sequence the DNA of Botryllus schlosseri samples collected from different locations along the Dutch coast. Furthermore the genetic results will be linked to morphology. This will be done in order to find out if multiple species along the Dutch coast are classified as one species: Botryllus schlosseri. In this research the collecting of the material, the morphological study, the DNA isolation and the PCR reaction were successful. Only the sequencing gave not results. Due to time constraints the sequencing could not be repeated and therefore no conclusions can be made whether or not multiple species along the Dutch coast are classified as Botrylloides schlosseri. However, it is expected to be possible to answer this question with relatively little extra effort focused on optimization of cycle sequence PCR and sequencing.
 
 
 

Peter Damen, Universiteit Leiden

Recognizing cryptic invasion
 

2012

 

Stefan Gordijn, Hogeschool Leiden

Ontwikkeling van protocollen ter voorbereiding op DNA analyses en determinaties van Asterozoa an Actinaria
 
Exotic marine species can be hazardous to local marine life. Therefore GiMaRIS tries to inventory and identify those species. In order to identify different types of marine animals protocols need to be made to differentiate between species. For this project we made two protocols in order to identify Asterozoa (star fish) and Actinaria (sea anemones) on a morphological and genomic level. Both starfish and sea anemones were studied, identifying the interspecific morphological variation present. In order to know if the protocols were correct, an individual starfish and a sea anemone were identified using these protocols and genomic material was collected. DNA isolation and sequencing analysis was used as an extra check that the species were identified correctly. 
 
 

Irene van Laatum, Universiteit Leiden

Behaviour of indogenous vs non-indigenous species as fouling organisms
 
 
 

Inger van der Meulen, UVA Amsterdam

Invasion risk of non-indigenous fouling species via hull fouling on recreational vessels
 
 
 

Laurence van den Bliek, HAS Breda

Geographic origen determination of Mytilus edulis
 
Origen determination using raman spectroscopy and bactierial growth experiments
 
 

2011

 

 

Thomas van Schie, InHolland

Risk of hull fouling species as a vector for non-idigenous species in Dutch waters
 
Non-indigenous species are considered to be a large threat to the world’s oceans. Non-indigenous species have the potential to change an environment and by doing so disrupt native ecosystems and cause economic damage. A potential vector for the spread of non-indigenous species are vessels. To determine the importance of recreational vessels as a vector for distributing non-indigenous species, the extent of hull fouling species on recreational vessel in Dutch waters were assessed. In October 2011, up to 731 vessels in five Dutch marinas were assessed and 52 boat owners were interviewed to determine the importance of general characteristics, maintenance and sailing behavior in relation to the degree of hull fouling.
 
 

Lisanne Korpelshoek, Universiteit Leiden

Resident harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena in the Oosterschelde (Netherlands): their behaviour compared to the behaviour of migratory harbour porpoises in the southern North Sea. Harbour porpoises are most abundant in the southern North Sea during winter and early spring. In late spring, densities become low and porpoises are suggested to migrate northward to calve. However, a small resident population seems to have established in the Oosterschelde: an area semi-seperated from the North Sea by a storm surge barrier, where tidal currents are strong. To gain more knowledge about harbour porpoises in the Oosterschelde, how their behaviour is related to that of the migratory porpoises in the North Sea and to determine the role of the storm surge barrier, acoustic research, visual surveys and stomach content analyses had been performed. Lisanne analyzed the data of these studies and combined the results with information from existing literature.
 
 

Tim Haasnoot, InHolland Delft

Survey for the genetic cause of the successful spreading of invasive species Didemnum vexillum
 
The main goal of the assignment is to process and analyze the dataset obtained from the Didemnum vexillum transcriptome sequencing to get a better understanding of its genetic background and metabolic processes. This is realized by using the computer analyses tool Blast2GO and carrying out a thorough literature search. D. vexillum is a marine organism that causes a lot of problems in the shellfish industry and forms a great threat to many marine ecosystems worldwide because of its smothering and invasive character. 
 
 

Medhi Habib, Hogeschool Leiden

The Disinfection of the tarra by using electro-chlorination
 
For the disinfection of the tarra there was looked to find a way not to  drain the tarra in the biologic waste. The tarra which are with the mussels comes from foreign countries and thrown into the sea in the Netherlands.  The first thing what done to disinfect the tarra is to ‘kill’ the other bacteria in the tarra. This was done by treating the tarra with several concentration of chlorine and get a high kill rate. After the samples were treated , it  seemed that treating the tarra with chlorine has some clear effects.​
 

2010

 

Jonathan den Boer, HS Leiden

SeSpeRe (SETL Species Research)
 
Data acquired with the SETL-project, i.e. 160 fouling plates which are analysed and replaced every three months over the last three years, is stored in a database. Questions like: “Do species have a preference for the location on the pvc-plate they settle on?”, or “Do species attract or reject other species?” could easily be answered with data from this database. Analyses like these would require a lot of time and patience, if done manually though. That is why I am going to make a computer program in which one can select the location(s), species, and the type of analysis one wants to do on the selected data. The program will then give the results, leaving you with exactly what you need to make your conclusions.
 
 

Frederike Lindleyer, Universiteit Leiden

Ascidians in the succession of marine fouling communities
 
The SETL-project determines marine biodiversity by identifying species which settle on pvc-plates. This is done for every season. However, marine communities on these plates could be very different depending on when plates are submersed and on the length of submersion. Succession may play an important role in species assemblage in which early colonizers have an influence (stimulation or inhibition) on later colonizers. My research will focus on the question whether succession occurs among marine fouling communities and whether the time of submersion of the SETL-plates determines the eventual (climax) community.
 
 

Ron van der Stelt, Universiteit Leiden

Floating artificial structures (or FAS) as a new habitat
 
Floating artificial structures (or FAS), like pontoons and buoys, form a relatively new and unnatural habitat. FAS have a unique combination of characteristics that makes it hard to predict which species will occur on it. In this study I will try to find out what species or groups of species have their living on FAS, using the SETL-plates as well as floating docks. So, a description of FAS, both abiotic and biotic, will be made. Eventually, it is interesting to see how FAS represent the Dutch marine fauna.
 
 

Shelly Persaud, Hogeschool Leiden

In recent years marine invasive species, i.e. species that are introduced in an area outside of their native distribution, have had an increased impact worldwide. This is at least partly due to global warming and partly due to intensified boat traffic. They can e.g. threaten public health, be a great nuisance for tourists, and cause substantial economical damage to marine systems and related industry. The rapid detection of a new species being tranported into Dutch waters in e.g. the ballastwater of boats coming from the American coast, can be of great help to reduce the chance of these species settling and becoming harmfull to our ecosystem and economy. For the rapid detection of marine invasive species, rapid species identification techniques are of the uttermost importance. Identifying organisms in their early life stages, e.g. in their larval stages in the ballastwater of a boat, on the basis of morphology can be a difficult to impossible task. DNA-barcoding as an identification technique is therefore becoming more and more popular. By sequencing the DNA of an organism and by comparing the resulting sequence with the known DNA-barcodes of a range of species, one can easily identify any organism. A disadvantage of the method is that one can only identify species of which the DNA has already been sequenced in the past. For that purpose GiMaRIS has joined forces with the TOPlab of the Leiden University of Applied Sciences. Marine species, both natives and non-natives, are identified on the basis on their morphology in the GiMaRIS lab after which they are sequenced in the TOPlab, with the well appreciated help of students like Shelly.
 
 

Simeon Moens, Universiteit Leiden

Settlement, spread, seasonality, and succession of the invasive violet sea-squirt Botrylloides violaceus and native star tunicate Botryllus schlosseri in The Netherlands
 
Invasive alien species pose a growing thread to nature and society. It is said that only some alien species possess trades that allow them to become invasive. They can spread very fast, can adapt to a large variety of environments and are serious competition to native species. To study these trades I have focused on the settlement behavior of the sea-squirts Botryllus schlosseri and Botrylloides violaceus. These are two similar species, which are very successful invaders in America. In Dutch waters however B. schlosseri is native whereas B. violaceus is an alien species. Questioning whether species show their invasive trades only in their non-native area, we are comparing the behavior of these two species along the Atlantic coasts of NW Europe and NE America.
 
 

Serrano Pereira, HS Leiden

SETLyze
 
To study fouling communities along the Dutch coasts, 14 x 14 cm, PVC plates are being deployed at a depth of 1 meter, checked for species and replaced by new plates every three months since 2006: the SETL-project. The plates are digitally subdivided in 25 equal grids (figure 1), and every species per grid is scored after which this data is stored in a database. Over the years the SETL database has grown exponentially, containing over 625000 presence/absence records for fouling species over the period 2009 to 2010. Here we present SETLyze, an application that is capable of performing a set of analyses on data from the SETL
database.
 

2009

 

Jan Olijerhoek, Universiteit Leiden

Known costs of invasive species along the European coast
 
Literature study: Substantial ecological and economical damage has been caused by the introduction of exotic marine species and their diseases, parasites, and predators. In recent years they have had an increased impact worldwide, at least partly due to global warming and intensified boat traffic. They can e.g. threaten public health, be a great nuisance for tourists, and cause substantial economical damage to marine systems and related industry.

 

 
 

Christiaan van Assendelft

Research on the individual and combined effects of copper and silver to Escherichia coli in water
 
Research on the individual and combined effects of copper and silver to Escherichia coli in water: Silver has been used as an anti-bacterial agent for ages. Vikings commonly used it for disinfecting their drinking water. We hope to prove that copper has a positive and maybe even a synergetic effect on the anti-microbial properties of silver. 
 
 

Joe Freijser, Van Hall Larenstein

Economic costs of fouling species along the Dutch coast
 
Substantial ecological and economical damage has been caused by the introduction of exotic marine species and their diseases, parasites, and predators. In recent years they have had an increased impact worldwide, at least partly due to global warming and intensified boat traffic. They can e.g. threaten public health, be a great nuisance for tourists, and cause substantial economical damage to marine systems and related industry. European legislation urges the responsible governments to take measures. Policy makers ask for innovative prevention, monitoring and control policies and instruments. The companies MatureDevelopment & GIMARIS are active in a value network, creating effective solutions. In the present study Joe has focused on studying the amount of economical damage that is done by exotic fouling species by covering floating docks, buoys, piers, and other human made structures in marine harbours throughout the Netherlands.
 
 

Bastiaan van Benthem & Marius van den Eshof, Forestry and Nature Management Helicon Velp

GiMaRIS Fieldwork

 
Marius and Bastiaan help out in the field and in the lab in various ways from data analyses to research material construction. Substantial ecological and economical damage has been caused by the introduction of exotic marine species and their diseases, parasites, and predators. In recent years they have had an increased impact worldwide, at least partly due to global warming and intensified boat traffic. They can e.g. threaten public health, be a great nuisance for tourists, and cause substantial economical damage to marine systems and related industry. Jan is doing a literature study for GiMaRIS focussing on the amount of economical damage that is done by marine exotic species in Europe.
 
 

Lotte Mens, Universiteit Leiden

Beschrijvingen van op hard substraat levende diersoorten van het SETL project
 
In the SETL project we are studying which marine organisms settle on plastic plates. These plates are hung in the water fixed to floating docks. Every three months the species that have settled on the plates are identified. I will make computer folders with pictures of all the species that were found on the plates until now, ordered by phylum, order, class, family and species. In addition I will also make a poster with pictures of the species and a project report with species descriptions. This all will make it easier for people to identify the species on these plates in the future
 

2008

 

Bas Schonenberg, Universiteit Leiden

 
SETL Project, A standerdized method for detection of marine invaders and study of fopuling communities (the Dutch Delta area)

 

 

 

 

 
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